How to Build Outdoor Heat Lamp

Jul 30th

Outdoor heat lamp – Starting from seeds indoors during the winter is a perfect way to get a jump start in the growing season. Any basic seed starter kit includes a growing tray to get your seeds started. If you are lucky enough to have between 14 and 16 hours of exposure from the South per day it is likely that you can get to work without a heat lamp, but beware of the curse of long-legged seedlings. Seedlings need to grow in temperatures between 65 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit or they will have long legs, meaning the stems are long and weak. Prevent this condition with a DIY heat lamp configuration.

Table Outdoor Heat Lamp
Table Outdoor Heat Lamp

Place the tray of seedlings in a greenhouse table or propagator dome. These are available online or at home improvement stores. If you cannot find a propagator or a greenhouse use a clear plastic container that is placed over your seedlings. You will have to drill a couple of holes in the plastic to allow a small amount of airflow. The goal is to keep warm air around the seedlings. Standard Insert, high intensity lamp incandescent light bulbs in a store of reflector outdoor heat lamp. LED bulbs last longer but do not produce enough heat. Halogen lamps produce more heat, but can pose a fire hazard if left unattended. Use standard bulbs and add a second reflector if you need additional heat.

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Outdoor heat lamp, fix the projector on a table or shelf close enough to the greenhouse effect that it heats the air inside. You do not want it close enough to heat the plastic itself. This may take a bit of trial and error. Then, add a second light if you have a large area to heat. The interior of the plastic or greenhouse will get slightly tarnished and the condensation should form as the seedlings grow. This shows that the air is warm and humid enough. Do not open the greenhouse or lift the plastic to check the air temperature. Look for signs of condensation instead. Also make sure that the light does not come in contact with anything, as it may cause a fire.

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